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Occurrences des observations de la campagne REMMOA Antilles (2008)

Latest version published by Observatoire PELAGIS, UMS 3462 Système d'Observation pour la Conservation des Mammifères et Oiseaux Marins, Université de la Rochelle-CNRS on Jun 28, 2016 Observatoire PELAGIS, UMS 3462 Système d'Observation pour la Conservation des Mammifères et Oiseaux Marins, Université de la Rochelle-CNRS

La donnée associée met en évidence les occurrences d'observations de mammifères et oiseaux marins réalisées lors de la campagne d'acquisition de données d'Observation par survol aérien "REMMOA Antilles" (Recensement de la Mégafaune Marine par Observation Aérienne dans les Antilles française) réalisée par l'Observatoire PELAGIS.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 513 records.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 513 records in French (29 KB) - Update frequency: unknown
Metadata as an EML file download in French (15 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in French (15 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Occurrences des observations de la campagne REMMOA Antilles, 2008, Observatoire PELAGIS, AAMP.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: 45ac6d5c-fa14-4300-b2dc-27a48fa70f63.  Observatoire PELAGIS, UMS 3462 Système d'Observation pour la Conservation des Mammifères et Oiseaux Marins, Université de la Rochelle-CNRS publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by GBIF France.

Keywords

Occurrence Megavertebrates Cetaceans Seabirds Aerial survey Antilles Guiana; Observation

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Vincent RIDOUX
Directeur
Observatoire PELAGIS - UMS 3462 5 allée de l'Océan 17000 FR +33546449910
http://www.observatoire-pelagis.cnrs.fr

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Vincent RIDOUX
Directeur
Observatoire PELAGIS - UMS 3462 5 allée de l'Océan 17000 La Rochelle FR +33546449910
http://www.observatoire-pelagis.cnrs.fr

Who filled in the metadata:

Hélène Falchetto
Provider
Observatoire PELAGIS - UMS 3462 17000 La Rochelle FR
http://www.observatoire-pelagis.cnrs.fr

Who else was associated with the resource:

Metadata Provider
Hélène Falchetto
Provider
Observatoire PELAGIS - UMS 3462 5, allée de l'Océan 17000 La Rochelle FR
http://www.observatoire-pelagis.cnrs.fr

Geographic Coverage

In Guiana, the French EEZ (4–9°N, 49–54°W), spanning 132,000 km2, extends 200NM into the Atlantic Ocean, including a broad continental shelf, a slope, wider on its western part and an abyssal plain where depths approach 4500 m. The French EEZ in the Antilles (14–19°N, 57–64°W), spanning 143,000 km2, extends from Guadeloupe and Martinique Islands, 200NM into the Atlantic Ocean and 80NM into the Caribbean Sea and northward around St Barthélemy and St Martin islands.

Bounding Coordinates South West [13.96, -62.75], North East [17.08, -58.49]

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 2008-02-04 / 2008-03-05

Project Data

No Description available

Title Distribution et abondance des CETacés dans la zone économique EXclusive des Antilles françaises par Observation aérienne (EXOCET - Antilles)
Funding L’Agence des Aires Marines Protégées a décidé de mettre en oeuvre, sur toutes les eaux sous juridiction française, un inventaire des populations de mammifères marins par comptage aérien. La priorité a été donnée aux Antilles françaises, de façon à fournir au plus vite des éléments pour le dossier de sanctuaire des mammifères marins. Une campagne d’observations, sous la maitrise d’oeuvre du Centre de Recherche sur les Mammifères Marins de l’Université de La Rochelle, s’est déroulée en février-mars 2008. Elle a bénéficié sur place de l’appui d’Evasion Tropicale et de la SEPANMAR, impliqués depuis des années dans les réseaux associatifs de suivi.
Study Area Description In Guiana, the French EEZ (4–9°N, 49–54°W), spanning 132,000 km2, extends 200NM into the Atlantic Ocean, including a broad continental shelf, a slope, wider on its western part and an abyssal plain where depths approach 4500 m. Several rivers open into these waters(Approuague, Oyapock, and Maroni) as well as the Amazon plume. As a consequence, extensivemudflats are present along the coast and coastal waters are highly turbid (Froidefond et al., 1988). Local oceanography is strongly influenced by the variability of river discharge, maximum in May–June and minimum in November. The Amazon plume is retroflected during boreal summer (July to December) when the North Brazilian Current is the strongest (Longhurst, 2007, Fig. 1). Moreover, wind-driven coastal upwelling occurs, as indicated by the presence of cool water in the upper 10 m (Gibbs, 1980). Productivity is highly seasonal and maximal during summer. However, chlorophyll biomass inferred from remote sensing may be unreliable since the color of the water in the river plumes is dominated by dissolved organic matters rather than chlorophyll light absorption (Hu et al., 2004). The French EEZ in the Antilles (14–19°N, 57–64°W), spanning 143,000 km2, extends from Guadeloupe and Martinique Islands, 200NM into the Atlantic Ocean and 80NM into the Caribbean Sea and northward around St Barthélemy and St Martin islands (Fig. 1). These volcanic islands are characterized by narrow submarine shelves and a steep dropping of the sea floor, especially in the Caribbean Sea. Despite high biological productivity along the coasts, Caribbean pelagic waters are relatively oligotrophic and characterized by a permanent stratification (Longhurst, 2007). The regime of winds, influenced by the displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, has a strong influence on oceanographic processes (Longhurst,2007). The southern Caribbean shelf resembles ecologically the Guianean shelf, the turbid water from the Guyana Current passing along the southern Caribbean (near Trinidad and Tobago) to form the Caribbean Current (Johns et al., 1998). However, water entering the Caribbean through the Lesser Antilles arc is largely dominated by the flow of the North Equatorial Current and of low surface chlorophyll concentration (Borstad, 1982). The seasonal cycle is of small amplitude but is complex with annual and seasonal variability and chlorophyll maxima in both boreal winter and summer (the second possibly induced by the Orinoco discharge plume passing in the southeastern Caribbean) (Longhurst, 2007).
Design Description Aerial surveys were conducted from the 4 February to the 5 March 2008 (15 days on effort) across the French Antilles and from the 29 September to the 10 October 2008 (12 days on effort) off French Guiana. In the Antilles, the survey was stratified according to the windward/leeward side of the islands and depth, including three strata: inshore Caribbean, inshore Atlantic and offshore Atlantic. In Guiana, a stratified survey design was implemented according to approximate depth categories, including three strata: neritic (0–200 m), slope (200–2000 m) and oceanic (>2000 m). Zigzag survey designs were implemented to provide a good spatial coverage within strata and improved flight efficiency (maximizing flight time spent on effort) (Buckland et al., 2001).

The personnel involved in the project:

Point Of Contact
RIDOUX

Sampling Methods

Aerial surveys were based on standard line transect sampling (Buckland et al., 2001). Transects were sampled at a target altitude of 182 m (600 ft) and a ground speed of 90 knots (167 km·h−1). Survey platform was a Partenavia P68, a high-wing, double-engine aircraft equipped with bubble windows so that observers could scan right underneath the plane. Survey crew consisted in two trained observers observing with naked eyes and a flight leader in charge of data collection on a laptop computer. A GPS, logged to a computer equipped with ‘VOR’ software (designed for the aerial survey of the SCANS-II program Hammond et al., 2006), collected positional information every 2 s. Additionally, Beaufort Sea state, turbidity, glare, cloud coverage as well as an overall subjective assessment of sighting conditions were collected at the beginning of each track line and whenever any of these values changed. The general protocol corresponded to published protocols prepared for small cetaceans (e.g. SCANS programs, Hammond et al., 2002, 2006). In addition to this, presence and group size of larger cetaceans, seabirds, sea turtles and elasmobranches were collected as well. Information recorded included identification to the taxonomic level, group size and angle to the track line, measured with a hand-held clinometer. Together with the altitude of the aircraft, the angle provided the perpendicular distance of the animal from the track line, which allowed distance sampling analyses to be conducted (Buckland et al., 2001). However, for seabirds, data was collected using the strip transect methodology based on the assumption that all seabirds within the strip are detected (Eberhardt 1978; Tasker et al. 1984). This methodology was used in an attempt to avoid disrupting the attention of the observers from the target species (cetaceans) in areas of high seabird densities. Strip width was 500 m on both sides of the track line in the Antilles and 150 m in Guiana. Identification was made to the lowest taxonomic level whenever possible, but groupings were inevitable for animals that could not be told apart from the air. Brown terns and brown boobies are examples of such groupings in the Antilles

Study Extent In Guiana, the French EEZ (4–9°N, 49–54°W), spanning 132,000 km2, extends 200NM into the Atlantic Ocean, including a broad continental shelf, a slope, wider on its western part and an abyssal plain where depths approach 4500 m. The French EEZ in the Antilles (14–19°N, 57–64°W), spanning 143,000 km2, extends from Guadeloupe and Martinique Islands, 200NM into the Atlantic Ocean and 80NM into the Caribbean Sea and northward around St Barthélemy and St Martin islands.

Method step description:

  1. Les données d’observation, ainsi que l’effort et les conditions d’observation sont transférées dans une base de données sous MS Access 2000 après validation par les observateurs. Les cartes et les pré-analyses de distribution ont été réalisées avec le logiciel ArcGis 9.2 et son extension Spatial Analyst. Les données sont ensuite analysées sous le logiciel libre R pour la construction des modèles spatiaux.

Collection Data

Collection Name Occurrence_Antilles_françaises_REMMOA_ovipa Observatoire_PELAGIS
Collection Identifier Antilles françaises_REMMOA_ovipa
Parent Collection Identifier FR_19170032700015_2670_PELAGIS

Additional Metadata

Alternative Identifiers 45ac6d5c-fa14-4300-b2dc-27a48fa70f63
http://ipt.gbif.fr/resource?r=occurrences_remmoa_antilles